Commack High School Girls Varsity Basketball vs. William Floyd

Commack High School Girls Varsity Basketball vs. William Floyd

Congratulations to the Commack girls varsity basketball team on their win over William Floyd. For this post I thought I'd cover where best to position yourself when shooting high school basketball. The first thing to figure out is how many left-handed vs. right-handed players you have on the team you're covering. Players will shoot with their strong hand and that arm will come up to block their face, guaranteed, so you want to be on side of the court opposite the arm that they shoot with. Some players will push off with both arms, in which case you need to be almost facing them when they shoot. By watching the warm-up you can figure out the ratio of right-handers to left-handers (and both-handers) and decide which side of the court you want to spend most of your time on.

Another factor is how the refs cover the court. Except for playoffs, there will normally be two refs on the court for high school ball. One will remain in the backcourt (the trail position) and the other will cover the action at the baseline near where you're shooting (the lead position). Most of the time the ref in the lead position usually sets up on one side where the key line meets the baseline. Obviously, you want to be on the other side of the key if you're shooting from under the basket unless you want award-winning shots of the ref's butt (trust me, I have plenty if you need some). If you pay attention to the refs as they cover the opposite end of the court you can see which which side the lead ref will come down as the play moves to your end and you can just quickly move to the opposite side before the play gets to your end. Most high schools have their backboards mounted on the wall or ceiling so this shouldn't be a problem. Many colleges, especially those with large arenas have backboards mounted on large stanchions that divide the area near the key. In cases like that you'll have to wait for a pause in play to move.

As I've mentioned in previous posts, I try to shoot at least part of a quarter from up in the stands at hoop height, assuming the stands aren't packed. This gives you a great view of the whole court with less chance of a given player being blocked by another. Shooting from up high as well as down on the floor mixes up your shots so they don't all look the same.

Have fun.

Commack High School Boys Varsity Basketball vs. Brentwood

Commack High School Boys Varsity Basketball vs. Brentwood

Commack High School Boys Varsity Basketball vs. Sachem North

Commack High School Boys Varsity Basketball vs. Sachem North