Commack High School Girls Varsity Fencing vs. Huntington

Commack High School Girls Varsity Fencing vs. Huntington

Congratulations to the Commack girls fencing team on their win against Huntington.

Here’s my strategy for photographing fencing. I’m using two camera bodies - a Fujifilm XT-3 with a 16-55mm lens and a Fujifilm XT-2 with a 40-150mm lens. I use the 16-55 when shooting from the side and the 40-150 when shooting straight at the fencer and also for shots before and after the bouts when their helmets are off. At Commack’s north gym my cameras are set at ISO 8000, 1/800 sec. @ f/2.8. I always take a custom white balance setting. As with all sports, AF is set to continuous and the camera with the 16-55 is set to zone AF while the one with the longer lens is set to single-point AF in order to prevent the AF from picking up the opponents back.

Fencing is more difficult to photograph than it seems. On the plus side, the fencers can only move so far. On the minus side, when they move, they move fast. You need to be able to react quickly. I photograph the bouts with the first and last weapons from the side and the middle weapon facing toward the fencer. When photographing from the side I’m sitting on the floor on the left side of the official and my fencer is on my right. I’m setting my camera to use focus points near the right side of the frame. When shooting a fencer straight on I’m using my longer lens and positioning myself slightly to the right of the end of the piste. My focus point is set in the upper right quadrant to cover their helmet.

I try to get a photo of each fencer with their helmet off before and after the bout, basically so they can be identified.

Any questions? Use the contact form on the website to email me.

That’s it for this post. Next up will be girls winter track. Have fun.

Commack High School Girls Varsity Winter Track

Commack High School Girls Varsity Winter Track

Commack High School Winter Concert I

Commack High School Winter Concert I